voice for democracy

Focus group: Biden weak on COVID response, strong on democracy – Axios

Atlanta
Austin
Charlotte
Chicago
Columbus
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Nashville
NW Arkansas
Philadelphia
Tampa Bay
Twin Cities
Washington D.C.
Menu
Get smarter, faster about your hometown.
Access hyper-relevant news analysis for your industry.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Please enter a valid email.
Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photo: Pool/Getty Images 
As President Biden approaches the one-year mark of his presidency, some swing voters say his handling of the pandemic has weakened him in their eyes.
Driving the news: These were key takeaways from the latest Engagious/Schlesinger swing-voter focus groups for Axios, conducted Tuesday, just days after the president's Jan. 6 anniversary speech.
Why it matters: Voters like them could be crucial to the outcome of the 2022 midterms, and their views of the president may color their enthusiasm for Democrats trying to retain control of the House and Senate.
How it works: The two panels were comprised of 13 voters who live in battleground states and cast ballots for Donald Trump in 2016 but Biden in 2020.
Details: Nine of the 13 said COVID-19 is the issue that concerns them most, but only four of the 13 said Biden is doing a “good or excellent” job handling the pandemic.
What they're saying: “He was stronger than I had perceived him to be," after watching his speech, said Christine M., 55, from Deer Park, Texas. Biden "let us know that we can move forward as a country and we can keep going and we can get over this."
Between the lines: Many of the participants were sympathetic to Biden's efforts with the economy but frustrated with the outcome.
But, but, but: Disappointment in Biden hasn't been broadly translating to wanting former President Trump back.
The bottom line: “Among Trump-to-Biden voters, there’s virtually no ‘buyer’s remorse,’ but there’s minimal ‘buyer’s enthusiasm’” for Biden, said Rich Thau, president of Engagious. He moderated the focus groups.
Illustration: Shoshana Gordon/Axios
In the two months since signing the $1 trillion infrastructure bill into law, President Biden has by almost every measure bombed big time on the things that matter most.
The big picture: Biden, who marks one year in office next Thursday, has never been less popular nationally, after personally lobbying his party and the public on Build Back Better and voting rights — and failing.
Photo: Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images
President Biden announced Thursday that his administration is buying an additional 500 million rapid tests to distribute to people in the U.S. for free.
Driving the news: The administration previously bought 500 million rapid tests in December, which are scheduled to arrive this month. With the purchase announced today, the U.S. will have 1 billion tests in total "to meet future demand," Biden said.
White House Deputy Chief of Staff Jennifer O'Malley Dillon speaks with White House counsel Dana Remus last July. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
White House deputy chief of staff Jennifer O’Malley Dillon is publicly attacking a new poll that gave President Biden a 33% approval rating, using the full weight of her office to call it an “outlier,” according to a memo shared with Axios.
Why it matters: By releasing a memo questioning the Quinnipiac University poll’s methodology, the White House is demonstrating how seriously it takes negative perceptions of the president’s job performance at the outset of a critical midterm year.

source

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *